One-year suspended sentence passed on journalist Emadoldin Baghi

first_img Organisation IranMiddle East – North Africa News Help by sharing this information March 18, 2021 Find out more June 9, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Iran to go further Iran is stepping up pressure on journalists, including foreign journalists, in run-up to election News Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders today voiced outrage at the suspended sentence of one year in prison which the sixth revolutionary court of Tehran has passed on journalist Emadoldin Baghi without making public its reasons. This suspended sentence could be changed to an actual prison sentence at any time during the next five years. This threat is clearly an attempt to silence Baghi, who often writes about violations of freedom of expression in Iran for the reformist dailies Shargh and Yas-e-no. Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists IranMiddle East – North Africa News News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 RSF_en June 11, 2021 Find out more December 8, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 One-year suspended sentence passed on journalist Emadoldin Baghi Reporters Without Borders today voiced outrage at the suspended sentence of one year in prison which the sixth revolutionary court of Tehran has passed on journalist Emadoldin Baghi without making public its reasons. At the same time, the organisation also called on the Iranian courts to give assurances as to the state of health of Iradj Jamshidi, the editor of the economic daily Asia, of whom there has been no word since his arrest on 6 July and incarceration in Evin prison.Baghi, who worked for Neshat, a daily closed down by the authorities, was tried on 9 November, but the sentence was announced only yesterday. It could be changed to an actual prison sentence at any time during the next five years.This threat is clearly an attempt to silence Baghi, who often writes about violations of freedom of expression in Iran for the reformist dailies Shargh and Yas-e-no.”I was unable to defend myself in this travesty of a trial which last only a few minutes, and I was barely able to speak,” Baghi told Reporters Without Borders. “What kind of trial is it where there is neither lawyer nor judge, or where the judge is prosecutor at the same time and where the defendant is not even told of the charges against him?”In his book, “The Tragedy of Democracy in Iran,” Baghi accused the Iranian authorities of being involved in a series of murders of intellectuals and journalists in 1998. He has already been imprisoned because of his articles in the reformist press. In his most recent previous trial, on 23 October 2000, he was given a three-year prison sentence for “threatening national security” and “disseminating false news.”After his release on 6 February of this year, Baghi was repeatedly harassed by the judicial authorities, summoned frequently to appear in court and banned from leaving the country. The harassment stepped up after last month’s visit to Tehran by Ambeyi Ligabo, special rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression for the UN Commission on Human Rights.Reporters Without Borders is very concerned about the fate of the 11 journalists currently in prison in Iran. In addition to Jamshidi, they include they include three journalists who were arrested at the same time on 14 June: Taghi Rahmani of Omid-é-Zangan, Reza Alijani, the editor of Iran-é-Farda (who is a Reporters Without Borders-Fondation de France laureate), and Hoda Saber, managing editor of Iran-é-Farda.Rahmani’s wife, Narges Mohammadi, told Reporters Without Borders: “The last family visit for the three journalists was on 30 October. Since then, for the past 32 days, neither their lawyers nor their families have received any news of them. We still don’t know what they are charged with. They have not yet been brought to trial. That means that they have been in preventive detention last_img read more

Manchester City record first-ever profit of Sheikh Mansour era

first_img City made a £10.7million profit in the 2014-15 season despite failing to win a trophy – figures which highlight how the club have been able to free themselves of any UEFA financial fair play sanctions. The club reported record revenues of £351.8million, up from £347million, but significantly have cut costs including reducing the wage bill for a second successive year. The wage bill is down to £193.5million compared to £205million a year before – Manchester United’s is £203million and Arsenal’s is £192.2million. The most recent figures for Chelsea’s wage bill are £192.7million for the 2013-14 season. City hailed the profit as an “historical step” but chairman Khaldoon Al Mubarak said the lack of silverware last season remained a cause for disappointment, a statement which may serve as something of a warning to manager Manuel Pellegrini. Khaldoon said: “The fact that we consider last season to be below par for Manchester City is a testament to how far we have come in the last seven years. This is a level of ambition that we should not shirk or shy away from. “It is right to have high expectations for this great club and the talented group of players chosen to represent it. “No team can expect to win every year, but competing to win in England’s domestic competitions and improving our performance in the UEFA Champions League are entirely reasonable goals for Manchester City. “The desire for silverware has always been a critical element of His Highness Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed’s strategy for the reinvigoration of Manchester City FC both on and off the pitch. “To put things in their simplest terms, we are now a profitable business with no debt and no outstanding restrictions.” Chief executive Ferran Soriano said the opening of the City Football Academy last December was a significant step and the expansion of the Etihad Stadium to a 55,000 capacity would generate more income. He added: “The 2014-15 season marked a historical step in Manchester City’s journey.” City’s financial results show the club are now competing with neighbours Manchester United off the pitch as well as on it. Overall revenue is in the same ball-park (£351.8million compared to United’s £395million), the wage bill is similar but City do not have to pay anything in debt repayments. Press Associationcenter_img Manchester City have made a profit for the first time since the club’s takeover by Sheikh Mansour in 2008 – and despite what the chairman describes as a “below par” season on the pitch. last_img read more